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Are Dogs allowed in Bunnings?

Are Dogs allowed in Bunnings?

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Are you also wondering why Bunnings has such a ridiculous number of dogs in their stores? Trust me; the dogs are not hard to spot for those who do not visit hardware stores regularly. You have probably already seen them posted online on Instagram, Facebook, or Tiktok and are probably not even surprised to learn about the ‘Dogs of Bunnings’ group on Facebook with more than six thousand followers. 

 

Bunnings has been open to dogs since 2015. They changed their policy, opening it up to encourage and allow dogs into their stores. People from the US or Europe may not see this as news because they live with dogs everywhere they go, but every Australian saw this as something significant. 

 

One week after opening, however, an agitated Jack Russel bit someone at a store in Melbourne. Bunnings had to update its rules to ensure that all dogs were friendly. Owners now have to muzzle their dogs, secure them in trollies or carry the smaller dogs in their hands while shopping in the stores. 

 

It is still incredible to have your dog accompanying you while you shop at Bunnings. No marketing gimmicks or competitions encouraged owners to post their dogs on social media; it was purely their enthusiasm. Admittedly though, the free advertisement was welcome. 

 

Everyone was excited about shopping with their dogs, so everyone tried it, enjoyed it, and shared their experience. The rest of the stores should follow suit.  

How to Take a Good Photo of Your Dog

If you took any dog owner’s phone and opened their gallery, I’d bet that the first thing you see is a selfie, a screenshot, or a photo of a dog. It doesn’t even have to be their dog; maybe it’s a photo of a random dog playing in a dog park. Significantly few dog lovers can withstand the temptation to take a photo of a cute dog playing nearby. 

 

And for those of us who have tried photographing their dogs, you might agree that dogs are not good subjects. They might be cute and charming, but don’t they just move around too much? Some are too shy, others can’t stay still for two seconds, and the rest get distracted too quickly. 

 

Some experienced photographers have a technique (maybe even an art) that helps them take good pictures of their dogs. You might have seen some of their photos on Instagram. Here’s their advice on how to do it:

1: Scrub Up

Make sure to groom your dog to look its best. Ensure to clean their eyes, bathe them, and brush their fur. 

2: Sweet Talk

Every dog parent has a word that they say to their dogs to either get them excited or get their pup to make cute faces. Play all your cards here; just get that cute face. For the deaf dogs, maybe your pup recognises a gesture that gets them excited. 

3: Accept Bribes 

If sweet-talking doesn’t work for your dog, pull out some treats. Ensure to get the dogs their favourite treats to get the cutest reactions. You can also use treats that stimulate your dog’s sense of smell if they are blind or deaf. 

4: Get Down

Squat or kneel to pet or play with your dog. This is a sure-proof way to get them excited-every dog loves playtime. 

5: Go Pro 

Get a professional photographer to help. 

Bottom Line

No, dogs in bunnings was not a marketing gimmick. Dog owners just got excited about getting to shop with their dogs. You might have to muzzle or leash your dog, but it is still fun. 

 

Many people enjoy carrying out their daily activities in the company of their pups. If you’re a store owner trying to liven up your place, try making it dog friendly.  

Frequently Asked Questions

Just like people, dogs are individuals. … However, some dogs prefer the company of human beings instead of other dogs. And while dogs may be pack animals, new research shows that as dogs became more domesticated, they may have bonded more with humans than with other dogs.

Just like people, dogs are individuals. … However, some dogs prefer the company of human beings instead of other dogs. And while dogs may be pack animals, new research shows that as dogs became more domesticated, they may have bonded more with humans than with other dogs.

Just like people, dogs are individuals. … However, some dogs prefer the company of human beings instead of other dogs. And while dogs may be pack animals, new research shows that as dogs became more domesticated, they may have bonded more with humans than with other dogs.